Communicating Effectively at the Workplace

MJ-t-sql-Tuesday

This post is a response to this month's T-SQL Tuesday #119 prompt by Alex Yates.  T-SQL Tuesday is a way for the SQL Server community to share ideas about different database and professional topics every month.

This month's topic asks to write about what in your career that you have changed your mind about.


Watch this week's video on YouTube

In my first years as a developer, I used to think that being a great programmer meant you knew the latest technologies, followed the best design patterns, and used the trendiest tools. Because of this, I focused my time strictly on those topics.

On the flip side, what I didn't spend a lot of time on were communication skills. I figured as long as I could write an email without too many typos or if I could coherently answer a question someone asked of me, then communication was not something I had to focus on.

Over the years I've changed my mind about this however: communication skills are often just as important (if not sometimes more important) as any of the other technical skills a great programmer uses.

The Importance of Communication

In my experience, I've found three major improvements from spending some of my learning time on improving my communication skills:

1. You get ideas across clearly, the first time.

Nothing is worse than spending a significant amount of time talking about ideas, requirements, and next steps, only to have to go through all of it again because not everyone had the same understanding. Not only does this waste valuable time, it may result in development rework and cause frustration among team members.

2. You leave everyone feeling good

Unclear communication, or lack of communication altogether, leaves doubt in the minds of those you work with. Not communicating clearly about your own progress leaves teammates questioning if your dependency will allow them to finish their work on time, makes your manager question whether the project will be delayed, and makes your customers concerned about the stability of the product.

Taking a proactive approach to communicating clearly sets people's expectations up front, leaving little room for any doubt.

3. You get your needs met quicker

Once you learn to communicate more effectively, you start to notice when others aren't doing the same. This allows you to recognize potential problems or unclear information from the start. Once you start recognizing this, you'll be able to reframe a question or follow up with more specifics, resulting in your needs getting met quicker.

Recommendations

Below are a few techniques that have helped me become a better communicator. I'm by no means an expert, but I have found these few things to work really well for my situation.

1. Put yourself in their shoes

Before sending an email, reread it from the perspective of everyone you are sending it to. Even though everyone will be receiving the same exact text, their interpretation may vary based on their background or context. You will be doing yourself a huge favor if you can edit your message so that each imagined perspective interprets the message in the same way.

2. Keep communication concise

Be ruthless with self-editing before you speak and with cutting unnecessary thoughts in written form. When writing, put your most important ideas or requests first. If anything needs to be seen beyond the first line, call it out by bolding the text or highlighting it. Don't risk someone skipping over the important parts of your message.

3. Follow up

People are busy. You aren't always a priority. While you have to handle it politely, reminding someone that you need something from them is important. If you communicated clearly from the outset, this is easy to do. If you reread your initial request and realize it wasn't as clear as it could be, this is your opportunity to do a better job.

More resources

The best way to get better at communicating is through practice. Be intentional about it. Write only what matters and speak as succinctly when it comes to project work. I'm far from being where I want to be in these respects, but every time I write an email, write a video script, or speak up in a team meeting, I want to make sure what I'm saying is clear and as easy to understand as possible.

Animating a Magic 8 Ball in SQL Server Management Studio

MJ-t-sql-Tuesday

This post is a response to this month's T-SQL Tuesday #114 prompt by Matthew McGiffen.  T-SQL Tuesday is a way for the SQL Server community to share ideas about different database and professional topics every month. This month Matthew asks us to write about puzzles, so I decided to recreate a childhood favorite in SQL Server.


Watch this week's video on YouTube

As a kid, I found Magic 8 Balls alluring. There is something appealing about a who-knows-how-many-sides die emerging from the depths of a mysterious inky blue fluid to help answers life's most difficult questions.

I never ended up buying a magic eight ball of my own though, so today I'm going to build and animate one in SQL Server Management Studio.

Fun and Valuable? Signs point to yes.

While building a magic eight ball in SQL Server is not the most useful project in the world it is:

  1. Fun
  2. A great way to learn lots of cool SSMS and SQL tips and tricks to use in more useful situations.

Here's an example of the finished project followed by all of the components that make this project work. The full code for this solution can be found at the bottom of this post.

SSMSMagic8Ball

VALUES()

I needed a way to store all of the Magic 8 Ball messages. Some days I like UNIONing together a bunch of SELECT statements, but for these "larger" static datasets I like the syntax of VALUES().

SELECT * FROM 
(VALUES  
    ('It is certain.'), 
    ('It is decidedly so.'), 
    ('Without a doubt.'), 
    ('Yes - definitely.'), 
    ('You may rely on it.'), 
    ('As I see it, yes.'), 
    ('Most likely.'), 
    ('Outlook good.'), 
    ('Yes.'), 
    ('Signs point to yes.'), 

    ('Reply hazy, try again.'), 
    ('Ask again later.'), 
    ('Better not tell you now.'), 
    ('Cannot predict now.'), 
    ('Concentrate and ask again.'), 

    ('Don''t count on it.'), 
    ('My reply is no.'), 
    ('My sources say no.'), 
    ('Outlook not so good.'), 
    ('Very doubtful.') 
) T(Response) 

ORDER BY NEWID()

After we create our data set of static messages, we need to randomly return 1 message for every shake of the eight ball. My favorite way to return one random record is to order the data by NEWID() (creating a random order for values) and then using TOP 1 to return only the first random record:

DECLARE @Message varchar(100) = '';

WITH MagicResponses AS ( 
    ...<VALUES() query from above>...
)

SELECT TOP 1 @Message = Response FROM MagicResponses ORDER BY NEWID();

Table Driven Animation

While I never have used this technique for animating an image before, I have used a control table to drive what data should get processed in an ETL.

In today's case, instead of saving the values of what data was last manipulated in an SSIS package, I'll be storing what each action each frame of animation should display, as well as how much delay to put in between each frame:

CREATE TABLE dbo.AnimationControl
(
    Id int IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    ActionToTake varchar(20),
    DelayToTake varchar(20),
    ActionTakenDate datetime2

);

INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('ShakeLeft','00:00:00.100');
INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('ShakeRight','00:00:00.100');
INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('ShakeLeft','00:00:00.100');
INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('ShakeRight','00:00:00.100');
INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('ShakeLeft','00:00:00.100');
INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('ShakeRight','00:00:00.100');
INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('Reveal','00:00:00.500');

WAITFOR DELAY

I wanted there to be a different delay between certain animation frames (I believe the final message reveal deserves a slightly more dramatic pause), so I'm using WAITFOR DELAY to achieve that.

WAITFOR DELAY @DelayToTake;

PRINT

The goal here is to print this ascii 8 ball shaking left and right before displaying the message. We do this using good old fashioned PRINT(). After printing a particular frame we update our control table to indicate that particular frame has been drawn.

IF @CurrentActionType = 'ShakeLeft'
BEGIN 
    PRINT(' 
                _.a$$$$$a._ 
              ,$$$$$$$$$$$$$. 
            ,$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$. 
           d$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$b 
          d$$$$$$$$~`"`~$$$$$$$$b 
         ($$$$$$$p   _   q$$$$$$$) 
         $$$$$$$$   (_)   $$$$$$$$ 
         $$$$$$$$   (_)   $$$$$$$$ 
         ($$$$$$$b       d$$$$$$$) 
          q$$$$$$$$a._.a$$$$$$$$p 
           q$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$p 
            `$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$` 
              `$$$$$$$$$$$$$` 
                `~$$$$$$$~` 
    ') 
END 

GO

You might be wondering why I decided to use a control table to dictate what images to animate. The trouble was that in order to get the PRINT to actually display our ascii images on screen in SSMS, the batch needed to finish submitting. So each frame we print needs to be part of its own batch.

Since we have 7 frames in our animation, we need to execute our procedure 7 times.

Alternatively we can use GO 7, but then we get that ugly batch execution completed message which I don't think there is anyway to hide:

EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO 7

-- OR
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO

Completely Useless? I guess not

I've always been a fan of occasionally taking a break to build things for pure fun. It's a good way to apply lesser known features to your code, stretch your creativity for solving problems, and of course push software functionality to their limits through feature abuse.

Here is the full set of code if you want to run it for yourself (note, this works on a 1920x1080 resolution monitor with SSMS at full screen...your results may vary):

CREATE OR ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball
AS
BEGIN
    /* Hide extra output to the messages window that will ruin our animation */
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    SET ANSI_WARNINGS OFF;

    /* Set up a table to keep track of our animation frames and insert into it */
    IF OBJECT_ID('dbo.AnimationControl') IS NULL
    BEGIN
        CREATE TABLE dbo.AnimationControl
        (
            Id int IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
            ActionToTake varchar(20),
            DelayToTake varchar(20),
            ActionTakenDate datetime2

        );
    END;

    INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('ShakeLeft','00:00:00.100');
    INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('ShakeRight','00:00:00.100');
    INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('ShakeLeft','00:00:00.100');
    INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('ShakeRight','00:00:00.100');
    INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('ShakeLeft','00:00:00.100');
    INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('ShakeRight','00:00:00.100');
    INSERT INTO dbo.AnimationControl (ActionToTake,DelayToTake) VALUES ('Reveal','00:00:00.500');


    DECLARE @CurrentActionId int = 1;
    DECLARE @CurrentActionType varchar(20) = 'ShakeLeft';
    DECLARE @DelayToTake varchar(20) = '00:00:00.100';

    /* If more than 1 second elapsed, clear the control table */
    DECLARE @LastRunDate datetime2;
    SELECT @LastRunDate = MAX(ActionTakenDate) FROM dbo.AnimationControl;

    IF DATEDIFF(millisecond,@LastRunDate,GETDATE()) > 1000
    BEGIN
        UPDATE dbo.AnimationControl SET ActionTakenDate = NULL;
    END

    /* Which action/frame are we currently on? */

    SELECT @CurrentActionId = MIN(Id) FROM dbo.AnimationControl WHERE ActionTakenDate IS NULL;
    SELECT @CurrentActionType = ActionToTake,
            @DelayToTake = DelayToTake
        FROM dbo.AnimationControl WHERE Id = @CurrentActionId


    WAITFOR DELAY @DelayToTake;
    /* Since we can't clear the Messages window, we need to fill it with
    blank space between animation frames to achieve the desired effect */


    PRINT(' 




        '); 


    IF @CurrentActionType = 'ShakeLeft'
    BEGIN 

        PRINT(' 
                  _.a$$$$$a._ 
                 ,$$$$$$$$$$$$$. 
               ,$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$. 
              d$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$b 
             d$$$$$$$$~`"`~$$$$$$$$b 
            ($$$$$$$p   _   q$$$$$$$) 
            $$$$$$$$   (_)   $$$$$$$$ 
            $$$$$$$$   (_)   $$$$$$$$ 
            ($$$$$$$b       d$$$$$$$) 
             q$$$$$$$$a._.a$$$$$$$$p 
              q$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$p 
               `$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$` 
                 `$$$$$$$$$$$$$` 
                   `~$$$$$$$~` 
        ') 

    END 

    If @CurrentActionType = 'ShakeRight' 

    BEGIN 

        PRINT(' 
                      _.a$$$$$a._ 
                     ,$$$$$$$$$$$$$. 
                   ,$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$. 
                  d$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$b 
                 d$$$$$$$$~`"`~$$$$$$$$b 
                ($$$$$$$p   _   q$$$$$$$) 
                $$$$$$$$   (_)   $$$$$$$$ 
                $$$$$$$$   (_)   $$$$$$$$ 
                ($$$$$$$b       d$$$$$$$) 
                 q$$$$$$$$a._.a$$$$$$$$p 
                  q$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$p 
                   `$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$` 
                     `$$$$$$$$$$$$$` 
                       `~$$$$$$$~` ') 

    END 

    IF @CurrentActionType = 'Reveal'
    BEGIN

        DECLARE @Message varchar(100) = '';

        WITH MagicResponses AS ( 
        SELECT * FROM 
        (VALUES  
            ('It is certain.'), 
            ('It is decidedly so.'), 
            ('Without a doubt.'), 
            ('Yes - definitely.'), 
            ('You may rely on it.'), 
            ('As I see it, yes.'), 
            ('Most likely.'), 
            ('Outlook good.'), 
            ('Yes.'), 
            ('Signs point to yes.'), 

            ('Reply hazy, try again.'), 
            ('Ask again later.'), 
            ('Better not tell you now.'), 
            ('Cannot predict now.'), 
            ('Concentrate and ask again.'), 

            ('Don''t count on it.'), 
            ('My reply is no.'), 
            ('My sources say no.'), 
            ('Outlook not so good.'), 
            ('Very doubtful.') 
        ) T(Response) 
        )

        SELECT TOP 1 @Message = Response FROM MagicResponses ORDER BY NEWID();

        BEGIN 

        PRINT(' 
                      _.a$$$$$a._ 
                     ,$$$$$$$$$$$$$. 
                   ,$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$. 
                  d$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$b 
                 d$$$$$$$$~`"`~$$$$$$$$b 
                ($$$$$$$p   _   q$$$$$$$) 
                $$$$$$$$   (_)   $$$$$$$$           ' + @Message + '
                $$$$$$$$   (_)   $$$$$$$$ 
                ($$$$$$$b       d$$$$$$$) 
                 q$$$$$$$$a._.a$$$$$$$$p 
                  q$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$p 
                   `$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$` 
                     `$$$$$$$$$$$$$` 
                       `~$$$$$$$~` ') 

        END 
    END

        PRINT(' 




        '); 

    UPDATE dbo.AnimationControl SET ActionTakenDate = GETDATE() WHERE Id = @CurrentActionId;

END;
GO



/*
CTRL+T first to show Results as Text

Then highlight and execute the following:

EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO 7

-- OR
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO
EXEC dbo.USP_ShakeThe8Ball;
GO

*/

Dipping into the Cookie Jar

MJ-t-sql-Tuesday

This post is a response to this month's T-SQL Tuesday #112 prompt by Shane O'Neill.  T-SQL Tuesday is a way for the SQL Server community to share ideas about different database and professional topics every month. In this month's topic Shane asks us to describe past accomplishments that help keep us going.


Before the start of each presentation I give, I'm a nervous wreck.

It's not that I don't like presenting (I do) but in the minutes before my presentation start time I'm always filled with dread . Once I start my talk and am in the flow of my content the nerves usually subside. Those first few minutes are always rough though.

Before speaking I try to calm myself by going through a few various techniques, one of which is thinking about previous successful speaking engagements.

You've Done This Before

I rarely focus on a single past speaking engagement; rather I look at all of my appearances and pick one that best helps for the current situation.

Every presentation I give has some kind of new elements associated with it; some of these might be environmental like a bigger audience or a strange room setup, but others are self-imposed like wanting to try out a new story-telling technique or an interactive audience exercise.

At this point, I usually have enough previous speaking experiences to try and rationalize away any stressful thoughts:

  • "Speaking is scary." - You've done it before, you can do it again.
  • "This is a big audience." - Your online audiences have definitely been bigger.
  • "This joke will bomb." - You won't know until you try. And your past session reviews indicate that people think you are funny.
  • etc...

The great thing here is that I'm always able to find a way to rationalize some successful past experience as having been comparable or more difficult than the current scenario. Even when I only had a couple of speaking sessions under my belt, I could think back to when I successfully taught my coworkers something, or had to teach my family members how to do something technical.

100% Survival Rate

I still get nervous before speaking, but at least I can also remind myself that I've survived every previous time I've done it.

I'm not sure my nervousness will ever go away, but having past successes to think back on always helps quiet those nerves just a little bit.

Why make?

MJ-t-sql-TuesdayThis post is a response to this month's T-SQL Tuesday #111 prompt by Andy Leonard.  T-SQL Tuesday is a way for the SQL Server community to share ideas about different database and professional topics every month.

In this month's topic Andy asks why do we do what we do?


Two years ago, I was
bored. 

I'd come home from work, spend my free time watching Netflix and surfing the internet, occasionally tinker with some random side projects, and eventually going to bed. Rinse and repeat, day in and day out.

I felt unfulfilled.  While I value free time and relaxation, I had an overabundance of it.  I felt like I should be doing something more productive with at least some of that time.  I wanted to work on my "professional development" somehow, but it was extremely difficult to get motivated to work on boring career stuff.

I decided what I needed was a long-term project that would allow me to have fun and be creative, while also having some positive personal and professional development benefits; what I was looking for was the ULTIMATE side project.

After spending some time thinking about different ideas, I decided to make videos about SQL Server.  Not only would I enjoy learning more about how SQL Server works (fun), but I could get practice writing and speaking (career) as well as get to incorporate my other hobby of film making into the mix (creative).

At first it felt forced; while I enjoyed learning new things about SQL Server, it was not easy thinking of topics.  Writing and editing was strenuous, but coming up with jokes and visual ways to convey ideas was fun.  Filming (and lighting and audio recording) was hard, but editing has always been pure pleasure for me.

So while at times coming up with a weekly bit of content was challenging, I kept at it because not only was it good for me, but I incorporated enough fun and creative elements into the process to look forward to it and keep going with it.

Fast forwarding to today, the process still isn't perfect but things have gotten better: I have enough ideas to probably last me a few years (and generating more all the time), writing is still tough but I've seen noticeable progress so I'm motivated to keep at it, I still don't like being in front of a camera but I have a dramatically easier time speaking about technical topics so the practice has paid off there, and while every episode isn't as creative as I'd like, I have a lot of fun being weird and coming up with new ideas for weekly videos.

Not only that, I now have new motivating factors that I didn't have from day one.  I've made friends with a lot of people in the SQL Server community, and they are fantastic and supportive.  Many of them even want to collaborate and make fun videos which is something I always look forward to.  The audience that consumes the content is wonderful as well; every time I receive a thank you email or comment, I am filled with joy.  And obviously all of the skills I have learned - technical, presenting, and networking - have helped immensely in my day-to-day.

In conclusion, the reasons that caused me to start creating SQL Server videos still apply, however over time that list of motivators has grown and helps me continue to remain excited about what I do, even when the challenges feel greater some weeks than others.

T-SQL Documentation Generator

MJ-t-sql-TuesdayThis post is a response to this month's T-SQL Tuesday #110 prompt by Garry Bargsley.  T-SQL Tuesday is a way for the SQL Server community to share ideas about different database and professional topics every month.

This month's topic asks to share how we automate certain processes.


Watch this week's video on YouTube

I'm a fan of keeping documentation close to the code. I prefer writing my documentation directly above a procedure, function, or view definition because that's where it will be most beneficial to myself and other developers.

Not to mention that's the only place where the documentation has any chance of staying up to date when changes to the code are made.

What drives me crazy though is making a copy of that documentation somewhere else, into a different format. You know, like when someone without database access needs you to send them a description of all of the procedures for a project. Or if you are writing end-user documentation for your functions and views.

Not only is creating a copy of the documentation tedious, but there is no chance that it will stay up to date with future code changes.

So today I want to share how I automate some of my documentation generation directly from my code.

C# XML Style Documentation in T-SQL

C# uses XML to document objects directly in the code:

/// <summary>
/// Retrieves the details for a user.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="id">The internal id of the user.</param>
/// <returns>A user object.</returns>
public User GetUserDetails(int id)
{
    User user = ...
    return user;
}

I like this format: the documentation is directly next to the code and it is structured as XML, making it easy to parse for other uses (eg. use a static document generator to create end-user documentation directly from these comments).

This format is easily transferable to T-SQL:

/*
<documentation>
  <author>Bert</author>
  <summary>Retrieves the details for a user.</summary>
  <param name="@UserId">The internal id of the user.</param>
  <returns>The username, user's full name, and join date</returns>
</documentation>
*/
CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.USP_SelectUserDetails
       @UserId int
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT Username, FullName, JoinDate FROM dbo.[User] WHERE Id = @UserId
END
GO


/*
<documentation>
  <author>Bert</author>
  <summary>Returns the value 'A'.</summary>
  <param name="@AnyNumber">Can be any number.  Will be ignored.</param>
  <param name="@AnotherNumber">A different number.  Will also be ignored.</param>
  <returns>The value 'A'.</returns>
</documentation>
*/
CREATE FUNCTION dbo.UDF_SelectA
(
    @AnyNumber int,
    @AnotherNumber int
)
RETURNS char(1)
AS
BEGIN
       RETURN 'A';
END
GO

Sure, this might not be as visually appealing as the traditional starred comment block, but I've wrestled with parsing enough free formatted text that I don't mind a little extra structure in my comments.

Querying the Documentation

Now that our T-SQL object documentation has some structure, it's pretty easy to query and extract those XML comments:

WITH DocumentationDefintions AS (
SELECT
    SCHEMA_NAME(o.schema_id) as schema_name,
    o.name as object_name,
    o.create_date,
    o.modify_date,
    CAST(SUBSTRING(m.definition,CHARINDEX('<documentation>',m.definition),CHARINDEX('</documentation>',m.definition)+LEN('</documentation>')-CHARINDEX('<documentation>',m.definition)) AS XML) AS Documentation,
    p.parameter_id as parameter_order,
    p.name as parameter_name,
    t.name as parameter_type,
    p.max_length,
    p.precision,
    p.scale,
    p.is_output
FROM
    sys.objects o
    INNER JOIN sys.sql_modules m
        ON o.object_id = m.object_id
    LEFT JOIN sys.parameters p
        ON o.object_id = p.object_id
    INNER JOIN sys.types t
        ON p.system_type_id = t.system_type_id
WHERE 
    o.type in ('P','FN','IF','TF')
)
SELECT
    d.schema_name,
    d.object_name,
    d.parameter_name,
    d.parameter_type,
    t.c.value('author[1]','varchar(100)') as Author,
    t.c.value('summary[1]','varchar(max)') as Summary,
    t.c.value('returns[1]','varchar(max)') as Returns,
    p.c.value('@name','varchar(100)') as DocumentedParamName,
    p.c.value('.','varchar(100)') as ParamDescription
FROM
    DocumentationDefintions d 
    OUTER APPLY d.Documentation.nodes('/documentation') as t(c) 
    OUTER APPLY d.Documentation.nodes('/documentation/param') as p(c)
WHERE
    p.c.value('@name','varchar(100)') IS NULL -- objects that don't have documentation
    OR p.c.value('@name','varchar(100)') = d.parameter_name -- joining our documented parms with the actual ones
ORDER BY
    d.schema_name,
    d.object_name,
    d.parameter_order

This query pulls the parameters of our procedures and functions from sys.parameters and joins them with what we documented in our XML documentation. This gives us some nicely formatted documentation as well as visibility into what objects haven't been documented yet:

image

Only the Beginning

At this point, our procedure and function documentation is easily accessible via query. We can use this to dump the information into an Excel file for a project manager, or schedule a job to generate some static HTML documentation directly from the source every night.

This can be extended even further depending on your needs, but at least this is an automated starting point for generating further documentation directly from the T-SQL source.

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