Who Stuck These Letters In My DateTimes?

How to handle JSON DateTimes in SQL Server 2016

Parsing, creating, and modifying JSON in SQL Server 2016 is really easy. JSON dates and times are not.

Coming from a predominantly SQL background, the JSON DateTime format took some getting used to, especially when it came to converting SQL datetimes to JSON and vice versa.

The remainder of this post will get you well on your way to working with JSON date times in SQL Server.

Breakdown of JSON date/time

In SQL Server, datetime2’s format is defined as follows:

JSON date time strings are defined like:

Honestly, they look pretty similar. However, there are few key differences:

  • JSON separates the date and time portion of the string with the letter T
  • The Z is optional and indicates that the datetime is in UTC (if the Z is left off, JavaScript defaults to UTC). You can also specify a different timezone by replacing the Z with a + or  along with HH:mm (ie. -05:00 for Eastern Standard Time)
  • The precision of SQL’s datetime2 goes out to 7 decimal places, in JSON and JavaScript it only goes out to 3 places, so truncation may occur.

Now that we know the key differences between SQL datetime2 and JSON date time strings, let’s explore common transformations when working with JSON data in SQL.

Parsing JSON date time into SQL datetime2

The most common operation I perform with these new JSON functions is parsing, so let’s start with those. Let’s see how we can parse the date/times from JSON using SQL Server 2016’s JSON_VALUE() function:

Inserting SQL datetime2 into JSON

Taking date/time data out of JSON and into SQL was pretty easy. What about going the opposite direction and inserting SQL date/time data into JSON?

Modifying JSON date time with SQL

So we’ve seen how easy it is to parse and create JSON date/time strings, but what about modifying JSON data?


Overall, working with JSON dates/times is really easy using SQL Server 2016’s new JSON functions. Microsoft could have done a really bad job not following the ECMA standards, but they did a great job crossing their T‘s and placing their Z‘s.

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